16 Epic Things to do in Page, AZ

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Page, Arizona is a small town on the Arizona/Utah border that serves as a tourist hub for Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Lake Powell. It’s often not thought of as Arizona’s most exciting place to visit, but stay here a few days, and you’ll find there indeed are quite a few things to do in Page, AZ.

Lake Powell alone has fantastic scuba diving, fishing, and boating opportunities, and the Navajo Reservation can provide days of outdoor adventure. Page is the perfect stop on any Arizona road trip itinerary and paves the way to visit the Grand Canyon. In this Page, Arizona travel guide will let you in on all the fun things to do in Page for your visit!

Get a US Parks Pass to Visit Page

To enter the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area you are required to purchase a Parks Pass. Pass prices are as follows:

1-7 Day Vehicle Entrance: $30.00 1-7 Day Motorcycle Entrance: $25.001-7 Day Individual Entrance (foot or bicycle): $15.001-7 Day Boating Entrance (one private vessel): $30.00

If you are visiting multiple US National Parks it’s best to purchase an America the Beautiful Pass for $80 for the year and grants you access to all registered parks. At just $80 for a year it’s quite a steal and you won’t have to worry about stopping at park gates to pay!

Where is Page, Arizona?

Page, Arizona is a small city of just 8000 people in Coconino County near the Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Powell. It’s less than 10 miles away from the Utah/Arizona border. Page was founded in 1957 when the Glen Canyon Dam was constructed and the workers needed nearby community housing.

Now Page serves as a tourist destination in Arizona and is most well known for its access to Lake Powell, Antelope Canyon in Navajo Nation, and Horseshoe Bend.

Typical Weather in Page, Arizona

Page has an arid desert climate with scorching summers and cold winters as it’s located at the southern edge of the Great Basin Desert. You can expect desert-dry air with peak temperatures ranging between 90-95°F between June and August. The best time to visit is in April, early May, Late September, and October, when temperatures are bearable. We visited in early April and found the temperatures and weather to be perfect.

Best Things to do in Page, Arizona

Glen Canyon Dam

Any visitor to Page, Arizona will have to cross over the Colorado River and right over the Glen Canyon Dam if coming from Utah. You cannot miss it as you enter Page! This 710-foot high dam was constructed between 1956-1966 and formed Lake Powell, one of the largest man-made dams in the United States.

It’s interesting to see the Colorado River, and it’s said the river is much calmer and colder than before the dam was built. Although the dam is a controversial one, it’s still pretty interesting to view and walk over. There is an excellent walking platform and Carl Hayden Visitor Center for anyone looking for a fun free activity in Page.

It is free to visit the visitor center and walk across the bridge.

Hanging Gardens Trail

If you are looking for a nice easy hike right outside Page, go check out the Hanging Gardens Trail. We went around sunset when there was no one around, and the views were plentiful. The trail is just over 1-mile round trip, with minimal elevation gain.

At the end of the trail is a beautiful setting where lush plants meet the desert. You can also get great views over Lake Powell here too!

Horseshoe Bend

Horseshoe Bend is a famed destination not only in Arizona but all of the United States. Heading here is one of the best things to do in Page!

I was under the impression that getting to Horseshoe Bend would be a bit of a mission. However, I was pleasantly surprised upon learning that Horseshoe Bend is just a five-minute drive away from town.

It used to be free to visit, but it now costs $10 per car for parking at Horseshoe Bend due to increasing numbers. Once you park, it’s about a 1-mile round trip walk to see the magnificent sight.

After more than a few fatal falls, there is now a viewing platform at Horseshoe Bend with a railing, although there are still some spots you can get closer to the edge if you dare.

While I thought the scenery of the “horseshoe” was mindblowing, I walked away feeling underwhelmed solely because of the crowds of this place. It’s still worth seeing; just be prepared to not have it to yourself.

Since the parking lot opens at 7 am, it’s unlikely you’ll be able to arrive before sunrise for photography unless you bike or run in from town.

The best time to visit Horseshoe Bend is in the early morning or late afternoon when crowds are lower. Cash or card payment accepted. The walking path to Horseshoe Bend is well maintained and well paved. There are a few points for shade and to take a rest along the way.

Lees Ferry and Spencer Trail Lookout

Since the crowds at Horseshoe Bend were more than we were hoping for, we decided to escape and work for our views by hiking up the Lees Ferry and Spencer Trail Lookout and it ended up being one of our favorite things to do in Page!

This is a steep hike up a series of switchbacks on a well-trodden trail; you get fantastic views over the Colorado River at the top. Similar to Horseshoe Bend but without any of the crowds. We made the hike up on a Saturday afternoon and had the plateau to ourselves.

It’s not a super easy hike with an elevation gain over 1600 feet in under 2 miles up. It will likely get your blood pumping, but there is nothing complicated or scary about this Arizona hike, and the reward is well worth the effort!

Come prepared to hike in the desert with lots of water and sunscreen, as there is no shade the entire way!

The Lees Ferry and Spencer Lookout Trail are best done outside of summer when temperatures are bearable. There is no shade on the trail, and you’ll gain elevation quickly. Make sure to bring lots of water to avoid dehydration.

Upper Antelope Canyon

Perhaps Page’s most famous site is the Upper Antelope Canyon. This is considered one of the most beautiful slot canyons in the world and is likely where you have seen plenty of Instagram images come from.

Visitors flock from all over the country and the world to walk through this canyon. Head here at the right time of day, and you’ll get picture-perfect photos of the light hitting the slot canyon ever so perfectly, lighting up the scene fiery red.

However like many beautiful places in the world, the experience has been slightly ruined by over-tourism. At certain times the canyon sees over 5000 people per day! That’s a lot of people in a tiny canyon.

You also can’t just visit. You must join an organized tour which is expensive, especially for a family. The tour guide will keep things moving, and the whole experience feels somewhat rushed. But it’s still one of those must-visit places to visit in Page! You can see what we shoot all our photos on here.

Tours start at $70 (plus $8 Navajo Permit fee) and are about 90 minutes long. All tours are run by a Navajo Guide and should be booked well in advance during peak season. 10:30 am and 1 pm are peak “sunbeam” hours and are the best time at Antelope Canyon for photographers – no tripods or selfie sticks allowed.

Lower Antelope Canyon

The Lower Antelope Canyon is a slightly less crowded experience than the Upper Antelope Canyon. It’s not as dramatic, but still is an incredible thing to do in Page. You’ll still need a tour to visit, which is expensive – just not as bad as the Upper Antelope Canyon. If you don’t mind the price, you could easily combine both in one afternoon.

Lower Antelope tours start at $60 if you have already paid the $8 Navajo Nation fee, you do not need to pay again.

Wire pass Trail

If you are not able to score a tour at the Antelope Canyon and want a great free alternative check out the Wire Pass Trail.

This easy hike outside of Page takes you through a beautiful slot canyon with epic views. As we couldn’t get permits to hike The Wave, or get a guide to do Antelope Canyon, we opted for this far less crowded (and free option) and loved it. Wire Pass Trail is a 3.7-mile out-and-back hike with minimal elevation gain.

While the first part starts out rather uneventful, the excitement begins as you enter the Wire Pass slot canyon. The hike ends at the Buckskin Gulch, although you can continue hiking in either direction in the gulch. Some even walk through the gulch on a multi-day trip or via horseback!

Note that if there is any rain in the forecast, this trail should be avoided. Flash floods are common in wet conditions and can be fatal if caught in the canyon at the time.

Waterholes Canyon

Another fantastic alternative to Antelope Canyon is Waterholes Canyon. This is a fantastic slot canyon that no one ventures to as not many visitor to Page have even really heard of it!

You’ll still need a tour guide to take you through Waterholes Canyon, but the benefit is you’re going to see far fewer people than in Antelope Canyon. You’ll be able to take as many photos as you want and walk at your own pace through the canyon.

It’s not as beautiful or dramatic as Antelope Canyon, but if you had never visited a slot canyon before, there’s no way you won’t be impressed anyway!

Tours start at $56 per person and must be accompanied by a Navajo guide.

See The Grand Canyon (North Rim)

Page is a jumping-off point for many visitors to access the Grand Canyon. From Page, you are still about 2.5 hours from the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. However, the drive there is stunning, and it’s still one of the closest towns in Arizona to stay to access the Grand Canyon.

The North Rim is considered the “Other Side” of the Grand Canyon and is only visited by 10% of all Grand Canyon visitors. The North Rim is over 8000 feet in elevation and provides breathtaking views. Nearby is just one lodge, the Grand Canyon Lodge, and one campground. So if you want to visit the “Other Side” of the canyon, the best place to stay is Page, Arizona.

The Toadstool Hoodoos Hike

We stopped at The Toadstools as we were driving from Cedar City to Page. We saw many cars parked and figured we might as well check it out as it might be unique. We are so glad we stopped at this hike as it was short and sweet and brought us to some remarkable hoodoos.

To get back to the formations, you’ll only have to hike 1.8 miles and gain just 141 feet. It’s a quick 30-40 minute stop not far from Page. I recommend checking it out on your way in or out of Page, as it’s about 30 miles away.

Enjoy Lake Powell

Lake Powell is one of the most prominent man made lakes in the world! It’s an epic spot for paddlers, boaters, and campers who want to come and enjoy hanging out on the shoreline.

From the shores of Lake Powell, you get absolutely epic views. I particularly loved taking in the views of Lone Rock from Lone Rock Campground.

While hanging out on the shores with a book in hand is a fantastic free thing to do in Page, I recommend taking to the water by kayak or by boat. You can rent kayaks and stand-up paddleboards at Lake Powell Paddleboards and Kayaks for $65 (stand-up paddleboard) or $55 (kayak) per day. Rentals Include free delivery to the Antelope Point public boat ramp!

It’s also possible to book a boat tour around Lake Powell which is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Lake Powell Boat Trips operate right from the Wahweap Marina and book up well in advance during the high season. Rates for a boat tour start at $120, and there are a variety of tours on offer; one of the most exciting tours is the one to Rainbow Bridge!

Enjoy the Sunshine at Wahweap Overlook

The desert is full of great sunset spots, but our absolute favorite was at the Wahweap Overlook. Just 6 miles from town off Highway 89 is the turnoff for Wahweap Overlook. Head here just before the sunsets to catch the awesome glow over the Wahweap Marina, Glen Canyon Dam, and of course Lake Powell.

There are several large rocks to sit on and enjoy the views and also a picnic table. I love this spot as it’s easy to drive right up. If you are looking for a low-effort thing to do in Page, this is for you!

Historic Navajo Bridge

Those traveling towards Marble Canyon and along the Honeymoon Trail can’t help but stop at The Historic Navajo Bridge.

These two bridges that span the Colorado River are a great stop off and give drivers the chance to stop, stretch their legs, and take in a different view of the river.

Construction of the bridge began in June 1927 and served well for 66 years until another bridge was built to support larger and heavier vehicles. The original bridge is not a pedestrian bridge to provide visitors with a view of the Colorado River from 467 feet up. Make sure to check out the Navajo Bridge Interpretive Center!

Cathedral Wash Trail

After passing the Navajo Bridge and continuing along the Honeymoon Trail road, a great easy hike near Page to complete is the Cathedral Wash Trail. Thie 3.3-mile quiet trail is great to do on a hot day as you’ll descend into a shady slot canyon and end at the Colorado River.

There are some notable (small) downclimbs, so good shoes are recommended. It’s a great starter hike to work up to the Lees Ferry Hike mentioned earlier. Pack water since you’ll be descending almost 400 feet – meaning you’ll have to ascend it later!

Balanced Rock

Continuing on the Honeymoon Trail Road towards Lees Ferry, you won’t be able to miss the two balanced rocks on your left-hand side. They are definitely worth stopping for a few and taking some unique photos while looking up in awe about how they were formed.

Kayak on the Colorado River

If you are an experienced kayaker, one of the best things to do in Page is kayak on the Colorado River. However, I would only suggest this to the experienced as you can quickly get yourself into a bad situation on a serious river. Kayak the River runs kayaking tours for beginners to get out on the water!

What to Bring to Page

Waterbottle: No matter where you are going in the desert it’s important to have a waterbottle on you, especially in the summer when it’s easy to get hot and dehydrated. My favorite waterbottles are made by Stanley. Specifically, their new hydration line that comes in fun colors, have straws, and keeps drinks cool for hours. Seriously our ice water stayed icy for three full days – the insulation is that good! Buy here. Hiking Shoes: You’ll definitely need a pair of good hiking shoes for going hiking in the desert. My favorites are trail runners made by Salomon as they are super grippy on the desert rock. See the best trail runners for women and the best trail runners for men. Packable Down Jacket: Just because you are in the desert doesn’t mean it stays hot all day. It actually gets quite cold at night and you’ll want a good jacket. We love the Arc’teryx Atom, but you can see our other favorite packable down jackets here. Sunscreen: Don’t go out in the desert sun without sunscreen no matter the temperatures. The sun is intense here and without any protection you’ll likely walk away with burns that could ruin your trip.

Where to Eat in Page, Arizona

We were slightly disappointed with the lack of good food options in Page for a small tourist town. There’s a Safeway if you prefer to do your own cooking; however, dining options could be improved. That being said, we enjoyed our meal at Birdhouse – their chicken tenders and mac and cheese are outstanding! Other options include:

Where to Stay in Page

Compared to nearby places like Kanab, Springdale, and Flagstaff, we found pretty good value on accommodation in Page. We stayed at the brand new Country Inn and Suites and have an enjoyable stay. Other options include:

Things to do in Page, AZ Map

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